Category Archives: ALWW

Situations and Relations

Back in February, I gave a talk to the UCLA Digital Labor Working Group about my network analysis with the Labor Who’s Who data. You can see my slides here: I opened with the idea that “the labor movement” is … Continue reading

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Networked Labor Movement: I reach an impasse, and go around

This is the fourth a series of posts I am writing to help me think through the use of network analysis and visualization. About seven months ago, I was merrily chugging along on this series using the index of the … Continue reading

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Networked Labor Movement: Edges and Mediators

This is the third in a series of posts I am writing to help me think through the use of network analysis and visualization. My first post in this series off-handedly introduced the phrase “bipolar labor movement”–which I suppose is … Continue reading

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Networked Labor Movement–one step backward

This is the second in a series of posts I expect to write to help me think through the use of network analysis and visualization. Read the first post, and a backgrounder. As one of my correspondents said of my … Continue reading

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The Networked Labor Movement

This is the first in a series of posts I expect to write to help me think through the use of network analysis and visualization. When I started converting the printed American Labor Who’s Who to an electronic database, I … Continue reading

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Old Book, New Data

Over the past year or so I’ve been working on digital history project that aims to convert a 1925 American Labor Who’s Who into a research and teaching database and wiki. It continues to be “a learning experience,” as my … Continue reading

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