Category Archives: History

Labor’s Many Robots

As I work through my book manuscript, I am coming across a rich crop of new robot images to supplement my earlier article Why Do Robots Rebel?  As it happens, the journal Labor Age was a frequent publisher and re-publisher … Continue reading

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Situations and Relations

Back in February, I gave a talk to the UCLA Digital Labor Working Group about my network analysis with the Labor Who’s Who data. You can see my slides here: I opened with the idea that “the labor movement” is … Continue reading

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Networked Labor Movement: I reach an impasse, and go around

This is the fourth a series of posts I am writing to help me think through the use of network analysis and visualization. About seven months ago, I was merrily chugging along on this series using the index of the … Continue reading

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Networked Labor Movement: Edges and Mediators

This is the third in a series of posts I am writing to help me think through the use of network analysis and visualization. My first post in this series off-handedly introduced the phrase “bipolar labor movement”–which I suppose is … Continue reading

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Networked Labor Movement–one step backward

This is the second in a series of posts I expect to write to help me think through the use of network analysis and visualization. Read the first post, and a backgrounder. As one of my correspondents said of my … Continue reading

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The Networked Labor Movement

This is the first in a series of posts I expect to write to help me think through the use of network analysis and visualization. When I started converting the printed American Labor Who’s Who to an electronic database, I … Continue reading

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The more things change…

As a parent of two Chicago Public Schools 4th graders, I’ve had a crash course this year in urban austerity.  Teachers are trying their best, but with 31 students per class, the school library effectively closed, and district mandated testing, … Continue reading

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Five Ideas for Digital Labor History

This article originally appeared on January 9, 2014 in LaborOnline. Over the last two decades, digital technologies have transformed practically every aspect of historians’ professional lives. When I entered graduate school in the 1990s, there were still professors who wrote … Continue reading

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Laboring Wikipedia

Or, How I Stopped Worrying and Learned to Work with Wikipedia Last spring I finally made the leap.  Like many other college instructors, I’ve found the traditional term paper a less-than-inspiring exercise.  Students, infamously, do not read a professor’s comments … Continue reading

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Old Book, New Data

Over the past year or so I’ve been working on digital history project that aims to convert a 1925 American Labor Who’s Who into a research and teaching database and wiki. It continues to be “a learning experience,” as my … Continue reading

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Visual Culture of Workers’ Education

This week I had the opportunity to present my work-in-progress on the visual culture of workers’ education to a group of scholars at the Newberry Library. The great thing about a deadline is that it makes you write.  And the … Continue reading

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Did they really read Marx?

Over the weekend I attended an excellent new book panel on Jonathan Sperber’s Karl Marx: a 19th Century Life organized by the Labor History Seminar at the Newberry Library here in Chicago.  The general thrust of Sperber’s book is to … Continue reading

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